Patient Surveys

Below you will find details of two radionic patient surveys conducted by Tom Lafferty.

Radionics : A Clinical Survey – 1996

Tom Lafferty MSc MRadA HFRadA

INTRODUCTION

The aim of the survey was to attempt to evaluate the patients’ perceptions of the benefits they were receiving from Radionic Treatment and to derive a profile of the patients themselves and their illnesses.

It was centred on patients of 4 Radionic Association practitioners. They agreed to fill in and sign a questionnaire, with anononymity agreed in published results. The survey form was based on that used by the Glasgow Homeoepathic Hospital, suitably modified to take account of the therapy of Radionics, and used with permission.  To give a randomness to the selection, the practitioners were asked to invite first 10 patients who started treatment on or after the 1st Sept or the 1st Oct 1996 to participate. In the event of a patient not wishing to participate, the next on the list was selected – continuing until the 10 target places were filled.  38 replies were received from the 40 invited. Note that there were random omissions in the replies. All observations etc are based on the relatively small sample used.

Click here to read the 1996 Survey

Radionics : A Patient Survey – 2003

Tom Lafferty MSc MRadA HFRadA

INTRODUCTION

A patient survey was conducted in 1996 and was successful in evaluating patients’ perceptions of the benefits they had received from radionic treatment (see Winter 1998 Journal; 44(2), 17-24).
The exercise was repeated in 2002 using a similar questionnaire to see if the picture had changed and also to generate information as a guide to discussion on future actions by the Radionic Association.
83 patients, selected randomly, agreed to participate but in the event only 59 (71%) returned a completed questionnaire.
Note: The value of the type of research carried out here was confirmed by an item in the Prince of Wales’s Foundation for Integrated Health Oct 2003 newsletter which read:
‘A report has been published by Tyne and Wear Health Action Zone which explores the patients’ perspective of complementary medicine (CM) and its perceived impact on their mental health and wellbeing. The research is based on qualitative data from the integrated healthcare pilot study in Newcastle Primary Care Trust. The report concludes that the fundamental approach and philosophy of CM has had a positive effect.’
‘The pilot study came third in the Foundation’s 2001 Awards for Good Practice in Integrated Healthcare and is shortlisted for this year’s Awards.’

Click here to read the 2003 Survey